In Photos; Argentina

Recoleta Cemetery is a photographers dream. The rich and famous of high society Argentina have been attempting to outdo one another in death (and life) for the last 100 years. Like anywhere else in the world, this often results in over the top displays of wealth. The family mausoleums found in the central Buenos Aires cemetery are incredible to say the least. The sculpture work is outstanding and the amount of good shots is boundless. This is one of many I have taken in the cemetery over the years. I terribly cannot remember the name of this guy, but I think it is a general from the army. Either way, the expression in the detail of this statue is amazing and most of all I love the Lion paw chair, such a display of raw power.

05 Apr In Photos; Argentina

Let the photogs continue. Not that I’m going to do much in the way of writing for this post, but hey, what does it matter, the photos are more interesting anyway. The following collection of ten photographs, have been selected (by me) from a bigger collection of photographs (most of which will be eventually put up on Facecrack) and are displayed for your viewing pleasure. They are a view into my experience of travel through Argentina over the last 6 months. So here goes nothing. Your peak into the way I see our world and the places I visit. Cheers!

The surrounding lakes of Bariloche and the Nahuel Huapi National Park are nothing short of spectacular, especially if you get a good day. I happened to have exactly that and was able to snap a great pano from the view point lookout over Cerro Campanario.

The surrounding lakes of Bariloche and the Nahuel Huapi National Park are nothing short of spectacular, especially if you get a good day. I happened to have exactly that and was able to snap a great pano from the view point lookout over Cerro Campanario.

This shot reminds me of a scene from 18th century Paris. The grey scale city sitting motionless and patient, awaiting change, yet showing signs of a full life already lived. This is the front of a grave in the famous Recoleta Cemetery in central Buenoa Aires.

This shot reminds me of a scene from 18th century Paris. The grey scale city sitting motionless and patient, awaiting change, yet showing signs of a full life already lived. This is the front of a grave in the famous Recoleta Cemetery in central Buenoa Aires.

 

One stand of one thousand stands. Every Sunday the area of San Telmo turns its main Avenue (Defensa) into one of the biggest ‘antiques’ markets I have ever seen, and or heard of, unless you consider the entire city of Marakesh and antiques market. Ha! I like this shot because it was really the closest I got to blurring the background activity while still focusing on the un attended stand, which was of course intended to make money. Hard to sell something if there is no one there to sell it, classic Latin America.

One stand of one thousand stands. Every Sunday the area of San Telmo turns its main Avenue (Defensa) into one of the biggest ‘antiques’ markets I have ever seen, and or heard of, unless you consider the entire city of Marakesh and antiques market. Ha! I like this shot because it was really the closest I got to blurring the background activity while still focusing on the un attended stand, which was of course intended to make money. Hard to sell something if there is no one there to sell it, classic Latin America.

 

The Berlina Brewery found 22km along the Circuito Chico outside of Bariloche is most likely my favourite small brewery in Patagonia. This is primarily because it is in the middle of a forest and I have to mountain bike the 22km to get there. This keeps away big crowds and if its open allows you to have a nice cold pint in relative peace. The bar tender in this photo is also the brew master and on this particular day I had to interrupt his work in order to be served a pint. Funny thing is I was pretty sure he had already had a couple himself, it was 1pm and there was Pearl Jam rocking in the brewery. Nice.

The Berlina Brewery found 22km along the Circuito Chico outside of Bariloche is most likely my favourite small brewery in Patagonia. This is primarily because it is in the middle of a forest and I have to mountain bike the 22km to get there. This keeps away big crowds and if its open allows you to have a nice cold pint in relative peace. The bar tender in this photo is also the brew master and on this particular day I had to interrupt his work in order to be served a pint. Funny thing is I was pretty sure he had already had a couple himself, it was 1pm and there was Pearl Jam rocking in the brewery. Nice.

 

Recoleta Cemetery is a photographers dream. The rich and famous of high society Argentina have been attempting to outdo one another in death (and life) for the last 100 years. Like anywhere else in the world, this often results in over the top displays of wealth. The family mausoleums found in the central Buenos Aires cemetery are incredible to say the least. The sculpture work is outstanding and the amount of good shots is boundless. This is one of many I have taken in the cemetery over the years. I terribly cannot remember the name of this guy, but I think it is a general from the army. Either way, the expression in the detail of this statue is amazing and most of all I love the Lion paw chair, such a display of raw power.

Recoleta Cemetery is a photographers dream. The rich and famous of high society Argentina have been attempting to outdo one another in death (and life) for the last 100 years. Like anywhere else in the world, this often results in over the top displays of wealth. The family mausoleums found in the central Buenos Aires cemetery are incredible to say the least. The sculpture work is outstanding and the amount of good shots is boundless. This is one of many I have taken in the cemetery over the years. I terribly cannot remember the name of this guy, but I think it is a general from the army. Either way, the expression in the detail of this statue is amazing and most of all I love the Lion paw chair, such a display of raw power.

I needed to add this shot to show whoever is reading this that I do actually have some friends in Argentina. After two years living here, I was kinda hoping to have better ones, but whatever these guys will do. ;) Jokes, I have been extremely lucky to make another set of lifelong friends during my time here in South America. Especially the ones on BA (pictured here). Thanks for the good laughs, the good conversations, and above all the good times!

I needed to add this shot to show whoever is reading this that I do actually have some friends in Argentina. After two years living here, I was kinda hoping to have better ones, but whatever these guys will do. 😉 Jokes, I have been extremely lucky to make another set of lifelong friends during my time here in South America. Especially the ones on BA (pictured here). Thanks for the good laughs, the good conversations, and above all the good times!

 

Finally got the shot. It’s not great, but I wanted to share it anyway. This is Woody. :) The classic Carpenter Woodpecker is an elusive one and I was lucky to see two (same place) while hiking 16km around the base of Tronador Volcano outside of Bariloche. Awesome day.

Finally got the shot. It’s not great, but I wanted to share it anyway. This is Woody. 🙂 The classic Carpenter Woodpecker is an elusive one and I was lucky to see two (same place) while hiking 16km around the base of Tronador Volcano outside of Bariloche. Awesome day.

 

Some days it is really difficult to get a bad shot at Iguazu Falls. Every lookout on the Argentine side is designed as a perfect viewpoint for another angle on the gigantic mass of water endlessly catapulting itself to a rocky grave. The scale of the falls is hard to capture and I have been attempting a few different angles to try and put this into perspective through image. With this one, look at the left side of the shot, you should see a small boardwalk with a group of people standing on the end. I hope this helps put things into perspective. The falls are incredible, seriously.

Some days it is really difficult to get a bad shot at Iguazu Falls. Every lookout on the Argentine side is designed as a perfect viewpoint for another angle on the gigantic mass of water endlessly catapulting itself to a rocky grave. The scale of the falls is hard to capture and I have been attempting a few different angles to try and put this into perspective through image. With this one, look at the left side of the shot, you should see a small boardwalk with a group of people standing on the end. I hope this helps put things into perspective. The falls are incredible, seriously.

 

Back to the Lake District and Bariloche, seems like most of my better Arge shots came from this years multiple visits to the city situated in the stunning Northern Patagonia. This is Moreno Lake as seen on a perfect summer day. Many Argentines have summer houses (cottages) somewhere in the lake district bordering the Andes. They are usually beautiful homes in beautiful locations and this photo was my attempt at displaying this.

Back to the Lake District and Bariloche, seems like most of my better Arge shots came from this years multiple visits to the city situated in the stunning Northern Patagonia. This is Moreno Lake as seen on a perfect summer day. Many Argentines have summer houses (cottages) somewhere in the lake district bordering the Andes. They are usually beautiful homes in beautiful locations and this photo was my attempt at displaying this.

 

Sorry, I have to finish off these In Photos posts with a vain self-portrait. This is me on the Garganta del Diablo (Throat of the Devil) lookout point at the end of the Iguazu National Park boardwalks. It is an individual waterfall which averages 3,000 cubic meters of water flowing over its edge every second. 1..2..3..4.. right now, as we speak. Think about that one.

Sorry, I have to finish off these In Photos posts with a vain self-portrait. This is me on the Garganta del Diablo (Throat of the Devil) lookout point at the end of the Iguazu National Park boardwalks. It is an individual waterfall which averages 3,000 cubic meters of water flowing over its edge every second. 1..2..3..4.. right now, as we speak. Think about that one.

Wherever you are in the world, I am sending you a giant high five and am genuinely stoked that you have made it this far into my third In Photos post.  I only have a few months left now on this contract and have some new ideas brewing for the next installment of my travel blog. So stay tuned and keep travelling. The world is in constant motion, don’t get caught standing still, you are bound to run into something that will change your perspective on life as you know it.

Peace and love,

Greg

Greg Snell
gregorsnell@gmail.com
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