Let the Photogs Begin; Patagonia

Paine Grande Pano

27 Feb Let the Photogs Begin; Patagonia

Sadly I have been falling far behind on keeping up to date with my personal travel blog (this one, From Shwa to Ushuaia). In December I wrote no posts, only one for January, and this will be the only post for February. I can attribute this lack of… say commitment, to many different things but really it comes down to me procrastinating and not really feeling the strong desire to write anything about my personal travels and adventures. This is somewhat contradictory to why I started the blog in the first place and I can’t really pin point an exact reason for my persistent procrastination. Anyway, an idea came to me recently that if I were to continue to be un motivated to write, I could focus on what I am seemingly consistently motivated on doing, taking photos.

This portion of my travel blog is going to highlight my time back in the Southern Cone of South America after a 7 month stint in Eastern/Southern Africa (the first section of the blog entitled From Shwa to Etosha). I have been back in SA now since October and really only four posts to this blog in 5 months is pretty pathetic. What I have been doing (instead of writing) is taking a shit ton of photos. As a small groups adventure tour leader I am extremely lucky to travel to some of the most photogenic locations in southern South America, over and over again. I have been putting together some kick ass photos with nothing really to do with them (except maybe share them on Facecrack).

It is time to start pushing more traffic towards this site and sharing more photos, who really wants to read my blabber anyway. I’d be amazed if you have made it this far already. 🙂 So with no further a due, please enjoy the first set of images from my first trip back as a tour leader in South America. These images were taken in late October, 2012 from Barilcohe through to Puerto Varas, down to Punta Arenas and back up to Puerto Natales, from the incredible W Trek of Torres del Paine and back across to El Calafate/El Chalten, ending finally in Ushuaia and the end of the world. This, my friends, is the stunning Patagonia as seen through my eyes on my first trip back.

Welcome to the far south. Puerto Natales, Chile sits at the base of Seno Ultima Esperanza or Last Hope Sound and is the gateway to Torres del Paine National Park and the famed W Trek.

Welcome to the far south. Puerto Natales, Chile sits at the base of Seno Ultima Esperanza or Last Hope Sound and is the gateway to Torres del Paine National Park and the famed W Trek.

 

A women sits contemplating life and travel with the majestic granite Torres standing centaury watch as they have done for centuries. Torres base lookout, Torres del Paine National Park, Chile.

A women sits contemplating life and travel with the majestic granite Torres standing centaury watch as they have done for centuries. Torres base lookout, Torres del Paine National Park, Chile.

 

Camping under a perfectly clear nights sky, someone has left their headlamp on. Laguna Amarga, Torres del Paine.

Camping under a perfectly clear nights sky, someone has left their headlamp on. Laguna Amarga, Torres del Paine.

 

The road leading away from Perito Moreno Glacier outside of El Calafate, Argentina. The mountains covered in just enough snow to bring out a beautiful winter scene.

The road leading away from Perito Moreno Glacier outside of El Calafate, Argentina. The mountains covered in just enough snow to bring out a beautiful winter scene.

 

Are you nuts, you want to go swimming in that? That’s just above freezing man. Alright yeah fuck it, vamos! Swimming in glacial lakes, Torres del Paine, Chile (literally). Shot taken by Stephen Robertson.

Are you nuts, you want to go swimming in that? That’s just above freezing man. Alright yeah fuck it, vamos! Swimming in glacial lakes, Torres del Paine, Chile (literally). Shot taken by Stephen Robertson.

 

This amazing shot was taken by Stephen Robertson. A slight glimpse of the Torres in all their glory after an afternoon of rain/snow/wind/sun, four seasons kind of day.

This amazing shot was taken by Stephen Robertson. A slight glimpse of the Torres in all their glory after an afternoon of rain/snow/wind/sun, four seasons kind of day.

 

Paine Grande and Los Cuernos Massive being clearly illuminated under the long exposure of the moon light crossing the sky. Another amazing shot taken by Stephen Robertson.

Paine Grande and Los Cuernos Massive being clearly illuminated under the long exposure of the moon light crossing the sky. Another amazing shot taken by Stephen Robertson.

 

This is the famed Beagle Channel and the surrounding mountains of Ushuaia. We had an awesome day exploring the Beagle by boat with stunning views, Sea Lions, Fur Seals, and Sei Whales.

This is the famed Beagle Channel and the surrounding mountains of Ushuaia. We had an awesome day exploring the Beagle by boat with stunning views, Sea Lions, Fur Seals, and Sei Whales.

 

This is my first attempt at a panoramic of the infamous Perito Moreno Glacier. This is one of the only constant glaciers on earth. By constant I mean that it is not only receding, but advancing as well, at a semi constant rate, every year. The glacier is also famous because when it advances it creates a natural dam against the land mass in the fore ground cutting off an arm of the Lago Argentino from the main water mass of the lake. The arm eventually gains so much water that the pressure against the natural dam forms too high and something has to break. Once every five years or so, this exact natural phenomena occurs and the ice breaks creating a giant plunge back down to earth and an amazing surge of water into the lake.

This is my first attempt at a panoramic of the infamous Perito Moreno Glacier. This is one of the only constant glaciers on earth. By constant I mean that it is not only receding, but advancing as well, at a semi constant rate, every year. The glacier is also famous because when it advances it creates a natural dam against the land mass in the fore ground cutting off an arm of the Lago Argentino from the main water mass of the lake. The arm eventually gains so much water that the pressure against the natural dam forms too high and something has to break. Once every five years or so, this exact natural phenomena occurs and the ice breaks creating a giant plunge back down to earth and an amazing surge of water into the lake.

 

This is the western side of the Perito Moreno Glacier and a portion of the Lago Argentino (biggest fresh water lake in the county).

This is the western side of the Perito Moreno Glacier and a portion of the Lago Argentino (biggest fresh water lake in the county).

Well that’s about that for now.  This is the first of what I hope to be many similar ‘photo blog’ or (photog) posts.  I am thinking I will take the best shots from each of my individual tours throughout this six month contract and create something along the same lines as what I have done above. Soooo, if you like photos and you like travel, then you gonna like the posts (I hope). 😉  Cheers from beautiful Torres Base lookout point in the Torres del Paine National Park, Chilean Patagonia!!

 

Greg Snell
gregorsnell@gmail.com
5 Comments
  • Anonymous
    Posted at 20:56h, 27 February

    Awesmome Greg!!! Your pics are incredible and speak a thousand words anyway so dont worry about the blog! Love your work!!!! xx

  • laosita
    Posted at 22:13h, 27 February

    Dude your pictures rival your blabber. And often the other way around. Regardless, glad to see something new.

  • gregorsnell
    Posted at 03:38h, 28 February

    Thank you guys, I am stoked that you are stoked. Honestly, it makes it all worth it. Should have some new ones up soon time. Safe travels!!

  • Anonymous
    Posted at 00:37h, 02 March

    Greg – you are a gifted writer. Your Dad and I never tired of reading your accounts. Your Nana enjoyed learning about your adventures as well. You also have a great eye for fabulous photographs. I love how you are focusing on what energizes you – photography. This is so important to do given the demands of your job as a tour leader. We look forward to your next post. lots of love Mom and Dad

error: Content is protected !!